Should Singing Activities Be Included in Speech and Voice Therapy for Prepubertal Children?

  • Tiija Rinta
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence and reprint requests to Tiija Rinta, Institute of Education, University of London, Department of Arts & Humanities (Music Education), 20 Bedford Way, London WC1H 0AL, United Kingdom.
    Affiliations
    Institute of Education, University of London, Department of Arts & Humanities (Music Education), London, United Kingdom
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  • Graham F. Welch
    Affiliations
    Institute of Education, University of London, Department of Arts & Humanities (Music Education), London, United Kingdom
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Published:September 12, 2006DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvoice.2006.08.002

      Summary

      Customarily, speaking and singing have tended to be regarded as two completely separate sets of behaviors in clinical and educational settings. The treatment of speech and voice disorders has focused on the client's speaking ability, as this is perceived to be the main vocal behavior of concern. However, according to a broader voice-science perspective, given that the same vocal structure is used for speaking and singing, it may be possible to include singing in speech and voice therapy. In this article, a theoretical framework is proposed that indicates possible benefits from the inclusion of singing in such therapeutic settings. Based on a literature review, it is demonstrated theoretically why singing activities can potentially be exploited in the treatment of prepubertal children suffering from speech and voice disorders. Based on this theoretical framework, implications for further empirical research and practice are suggested.

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