Subglottal Pressure Oscillations Accompanying Phonation

  • Johan Sundberg
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence and reprint requests to Johan Sundberg, Department of Speech, Music, and Hearing, School of Computer Science and Communication, KTH Voice Research Centre, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Affiliations
    Department of Speech, Music, and Hearing, School of Computer Science and Communication, KTH Voice Research Centre, Stockholm, Sweden
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  • Ronald Scherer
    Affiliations
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, 200 Health Center, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio
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  • Markus Hess
    Affiliations
    Department of Phoniatrics and Paedaudiology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany
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  • Frank Müller
    Affiliations
    Department of Phoniatrics and Paedaudiology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany
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  • Svante Granqvist
    Affiliations
    Department of Speech, Music, and Hearing, School of Computer Science and Communication, KTH Voice Research Centre, Stockholm, Sweden
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      Summary

      Acoustic and aerodynamic properties of the voice source and vocal tract have been extensively analyzed during the last half century. Corresponding investigations of the subglottal system are rare but can be assumed to be relevant to voice production. In the present exploratory study, subglottal pressure was recorded in a male adult subject by means of tracheal puncture. Also recorded were the oral airflow and audio signals. Effects of vowel, phonation type, and vocal register shifts on the subglottal pressure waveform were examined. The moment of maximum flow declination rate was synchronous with the main positive peak of the subglottal pressure waveform. The three lowest subglottal resonance frequencies, determined by inverse filtering and long-term average spectra of the subglottal pressure during speech, were found to be about 500, 1220, and 2000 Hz, irrespective of supraglottal variations and phonation type. However, the subglottal pressure waveform was affected by the supraglottal formants, whereas the radiated vowel spectra did not show clear influence by the subglottal resonances. The fundamental frequency immediately preceding and immediately following a register break in pitch glides did not show systematic relationships with formants or with the lowest subglottal resonance.

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