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The Effect of Surface Hydration on Teachers' Voice Quality: An Intervention Study

  • Émile Rocha Santana
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence and reprint requests to Émile Rocha Santana, Master Program of Health, Environment and Work, Federal University of Bahia (PPGSAT—UFBA), Salvador, Brazil; Program of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, União Metropolitana para Educação e Cultura University (UNIME), Lauro de Freitas, Brazil; Rua Armando Tavares, 13, Edf Manoel Prado, apt 12, Vila Laura Salvador, Bahia, Brazil.
    Affiliations
    Master Program of Health, Environment and Work, Federal University of Bahia (PPGSAT—UFBA), Salvador, Brazil

    Undergraduate Program of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, União Metropolitana para Educação e Cultura University (UNIME), Lauro de Freitas, Brazil
    Search for articles by this author
  • Maria Lúcia Vaz Masson
    Affiliations
    Master Program of Health, Environment and Work, Federal University of Bahia (PPGSAT—UFBA), Salvador, Brazil

    Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, Federal University of Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, Brazil
    Search for articles by this author
  • Tânia Maria Araújo
    Affiliations
    Master Program of Health, Environment and Work, Federal University of Bahia (PPGSAT—UFBA), Salvador, Brazil

    Department of Health, State University of Feira de Santana (UEFS), Feira de Santana, Brazil
    Search for articles by this author
Published:October 17, 2016DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvoice.2016.08.019

      Summary

      Purpose

      This study aimed to investigate the effects of surface hydration on teachers' voice quality.

      Study Design

      This is an examiner-blinded, pretest and posttest intervention study with a single group of subjects.

      Method

      Subjects were 27 teachers from a public-sector state school in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. Pre- and post-intervention voice recordings were obtained. Voice samples collected underwent computerized acoustic analysis (VoxMetria) and perceptual analysis via the Consensus Auditory-Perceptual Evaluation of Voice. Intervention was conducted daily before teaching for a 4-week period, consisting of 5 minutes of nebulization with saline solution (NaCl 0.9%), after 10 minutes of dehydration breathing through the mouth.

      Results

      A reduction in the overall level of voice alteration was observed in the Consensus Auditory-Perceptual Evaluation of Voice, but with no statistical significance. The following were observed: an increase in the mean fundamental frequency of the vowel /a:/ (P = 0.036); a statistically significant reduction in the minimum intensity of connected speech (P = 0.028), in the median intensity of connected speech (P = 0.014), and in the maximum intensity of connected speech (P = 0.007). There was also a statistically significant reduction in the minimum (P = 0.001) and mean intensities of spontaneous speech (P = 0.011).

      Conclusion

      Surface hydration with saline solution led to an improvement in teachers' voice quality.

      Key Words

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