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Pre- and Postoperative High-Speed Videolaryngoscopy Findings in Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia Following Transoral CO2 LASER-Guided Thyroarytenoid Myoneurectomy

Published:October 03, 2020DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvoice.2020.09.016

      Summary

      Introduction

      Vocal cord vibration after transoral CO2 LASER-guided thyroarytenoid (TA) myoneurectomy in adductor spasmodic dysphonia (AdSD) patients is unclear to date. The precise vibratory patterns in AdSD patients are difficult to evaluate with routine videolaryngostroboscopy. High-speed videolaryngoscopy (HSV) is an ideal choice to evaluate such patients. This study was performed to compare pre- and postoperative, after 6 months, vocal fold vibratory onset delay (VFVOD) and closed phase glottal cycle (CPGC) in AdSD patients following transoral CO2 LASER-guided TA myoneurectomy using the HSV.

      Materials and methods

      Retrospective study, conducted from January, 2016 to January, 2019, of the AdSD patients who underwent transoral CO2 LASER-guided TA myoneurectomy using the HSV. Patient data were acquired from the hospital database to evaluate VFVOD and CPGC from HSV recordings of the patients. VFVOD was calculated as sum of prephonatory delay (PPD) and steady-state delay (SSD). The PPD and SSD were evaluated and compared separately for each patient. The MedCal Version 19.2.6 was used for data analysis. Paired sample t test was performed to compute the significance of the difference between the mean of the dataset. A P value less than 0.05 was considered significant.

      Results

      A total of nine patients were included in the study, out of which three were females and six were males. The average age was 45.5 ± 6.9 years. The mean of postoperative PPD (166.8 ± 22.1), SSD (76.5 ± 8.6), and CPGC (62.6 ± 4.8) were significantly less than mean of preoperative PPD (222.6 ± 22.1), SSD (97.7 ± 9.5), and CPGC (71.6 ± 5 %), with P values of 0.0007, 0.0001, and 0.0001, respectively.

      Conclusions

      There was a significant decrease in VFVOD and CPGC posttransoral CO2 LASER-guided TA myoneurectomy in AdSD patients after 6 months follow-up. This study also establishes efficiency of the HSV to measure the vocal cord vibration in the patients with AdSD. The primary limitations of the study were the small sample size and its retrospective nature. Future prospective studies with increased sample size can further substantiate the findings of the work performed here.

      Key Words

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