Advertisement

Coprevalence of Presbycusis and Its Effect on Outcome of Voice Therapy in Patients With Presbyphonia

  • Ji Hye Park
    Affiliations
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Eulji Medical Center, Eulji University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
    Search for articles by this author
  • Minsuk Chae
    Affiliations
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Eulji Medical Center, Eulji University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
    Search for articles by this author
  • Yong-Hwi An
    Affiliations
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Eulji Medical Center, Eulji University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
    Search for articles by this author
  • Hyun Joon Shim
    Affiliations
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Eulji Medical Center, Eulji University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
    Search for articles by this author
  • Minsu Kwon
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence and reprint requests to Minsu Kwon, Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Korea University Anam Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, 145 Anam-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 02841, Republic of Korea.
    Affiliations
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Korea University Anam Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
    Search for articles by this author
Published:October 14, 2020DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvoice.2020.09.030

      Summary

      Objective

      To identify the coprevalence of presbycusis and presbycusis and analyze the effect of presbycusis on compliance and result of voice therapy in presbycusis patients.

      Methods

      This cross-sectional, prospective cohort study initially screened patients aged ≥65 years who visited our hospital from February 2019 to January 2020. Unaided pure tone audiometry was performed in these subjects to determine the presence of presbycusis. Perceptual voice assessment by an examiner was conducted for screening of presbycusis, and its diagnosis was confirmed through the voice handicap index-10 (VHI-10) questionnaire and a laryngoscopic exam. Patients with presbycusis underwent voice therapy and were assessed for their compliance and outcomes of the treatment according to the coexistence of presbycusis.

      Results

      Among the 221 patients, presbycusis and presbycusis were diagnosed in 125 (56.6%) and 110 (49.8%) patients, respectively. The copresence of these two disorders were identified in 87 (39.4%) patients, and there was a significant correlation between presbycusis and presbycusis. The effects of voice therapy were examined in the consecutive 40 patients who were diagnosed with presbycusis. There were 21 patients without presbycusis and 19 patients with presbycusis. The average pretreatment voice handicap index-10 score was significantly higher in presbycusis patients; there was no significant difference in the incidence of dropout from voice therapy between the groups. The patients without presbycusis showed a significant improvement in the functional communication measurement (FCM) level and maximum phonation time (MPT) compared with those of patients with presbycusis after voice therapy.

      Conclusions

      Presbyphonia and presbycusis coexisted in many elderly people. The improvement in the FCM level and MPT after voice therapy was relatively low if patients with presbycusis accompanied by presbycusis. The copresence of presbycusis did not significantly affect compliance with voice therapy in the patients.

      Key Words

      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic & Personal: 24 hour online accessCorporate R&D Professionals: 24 hour online access
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to Journal of Voice
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      References

      1. Department of economic and social affairs population dynamics in Unitied Nations. World Population Prospects; 2019. https://population.un.org/wpp. Accessed March 20, 2020.

        • Fulop T
        • Larbi A
        • Khalil A
        • et al.
        Are we ill because we age?.
        Front Physiol. 2019; 10: 1508
        • He ZH
        • Li M
        • Zou SY
        • et al.
        Protection and prevention of age-related hearing loss.
        Adv Exp Med Biol. 2019; 1130: 59-71
        • Kendall K.
        Presbyphonia: a review.
        Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2007; 15: 137-140
        • Kost KM
        • Sataloff RT.
        Voice disorders in the elderly.
        Clin Geriatr Med. 2018; 34: 191-203
        • Cohen SM
        • Turley R.
        Coprevalence and impact of dysphonia and hearing loss in the elderly.
        Laryngoscope. 2009; 119: 1870-1873
        • Monini S
        • Filippi C
        • Baldini R
        • et al.
        Perceived disability from hearing and voice changes in the elderly.
        Geriatr Gerontol Int. 2015; 15: 147-155
        • Pontes P
        • Yamasaki R
        • Behlau M
        Morphological and functional aspects of the senile larynx.
        Folia Phoniatr Logop. 2006; 58: 151-158
        • Lowell SH
        • Paparella MM.
        Presbycusis: what is it?.
        Laryngoscope. 1977; 87: 1710-1717
        • Mau T
        • Jacobson BH
        • Garrett CG
        Factors associated with voice therapy outcomes in the treatment of presbycusis.
        Laryngoscope. 2010; 120: 1181-1187
      2. UCSF Biostatistics: Power and Sample Size Programs. http://www.biostat.ucsf.edu/sampsize.html. Accessed March 20, 2020.

        • Godoy J
        • Silverio K
        • Brasolotto A
        Effectiveness of vocal therapy for the elderly when applying conventional and intensive approaches: a randomized clinical trial.
        J Voice. 2019; 33: 809.e819-809.e826
        • American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
        National Outcomes Measurement System (NOMS): Adult Speech Language Pathology User's Guide.
        American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Rockville MD2002
        • Ross J
        • Valentino WL
        • Calder A
        • et al.
        Utility of audiometry in the evaluation of patients presenting with dysphonia.
        Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol. 2020; 129: 333-339
      3. Nagy A, Elshafei R, Mahmoud S. Correlating undiagnosed hearing impairment with hyperfunctional dysphonia. J Voice [Epub ahead of print].

      4. Wong HY, Ma EP. Self-perceived voice problems in a nontreatment seeking older population in Hong Kong. J Voice [Epub ahead of print].

        • Hassan SM
        • Malki KH
        • Mesallam TA
        • et al.
        The effect of cochlear implantation and post-operative rehabilitation on acoustic voice analysis in post-lingual hearing impaired adults.
        Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 2011; 268: 1437-1442
        • Pessin AB
        • Tavares EL
        • Gramuglia AC
        • et al.
        Voice and ageing: clinical, endoscopic and acoustic investigation.
        Clin Otolaryngol. 2017; 42: 330-335
        • McKee MM
        • Stransky ML
        • Reichard A
        Hearing loss and associated medical conditions among individuals 65 years and older.
        Disabil Health J. 2018; 11: 122-125
        • Park JH
        • Byeon HK
        • Park KN
        • et al.
        Epidemiological association of olfactory dysfunction with hearing loss and dysphonia in the Korean population: A cross-sectional study.
        Medicine. 2017; 96: e8890