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Neurectomy and Myomectomy for Treatment of Spasmodic Dysphonia

  • William Ryan
    Affiliations
    Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
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  • Ghiath Alnouri
    Affiliations
    Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
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  • Robert T. Sataloff
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence and reprint requests to: Robert T Sataloff, Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Senior Associate Dean for Clinical Academic Specialties, Drexel University College of Medicine, Director of Otolaryngology and Communication Sciences Research, Lankenau Institute for Medical Research, 219 N. Broad Street, 10th Floor, Philadelphia, PA 19107.
    Affiliations
    Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Senior Associate Dean for Clinical Academic Specialties, Drexel University College of Medicine, Director of Otolaryngology, and Communication Sciences Research, Lankenau Institute for Medical Research, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
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      SUMMARY

      Spasmodic dysphonia (SD) is a debilitating neurological disorder affecting the muscles of voice production. Sudden involuntary movements of the vocal folds lead to phonatory breaks and to forced, strained, and strangled voice quality in adductor SD, or breathy breaks in abductor SD. There is currently no cure for spasmodic dysphonia, and the gold standard for treatment is the injection of botulinum toxin in small amounts to the intrinsic laryngeal musculature.
      • Blitzer A.
      • Brin M.F.
      • Stewart C.F
      Botulinum toxin management of spasmodic dysphonia (laryngeal dystonia): a 12-year experience in more than 900 patients.
      However, botulinum treatment requires periodic reinjection, produces vocal instability immediately after injection, lacks uniform results among patients, and patients can develop antibodies to botulinum toxin. Long-term or permanent symptom relief would be ideal. We present four patients with adductor and one patient with abductor spasmodic dysphonia who underwent neurectomy and myomectomy for treatment. The mean age was 64 years (age range 45-83). The mean duration of adductor spasmodic dysphonia was 11.8 years. The duration of abductor spasmodic was 4 years. All patients had previously been treated with voice therapy and botulinum toxin A. The mean duration of follow up was 1.7 years. Four patients had subjective and objective improvement after surgery. One patient had subjective improvement.

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