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Author Response to Aerodynamic Measures in Muscle Tension Dysphonia

      Thank-you for your interest in our article. We agree that estimated subglottal pressure is a valid measure for assessing an extensive aerodynamic profile of an individual with a voice disorder, and members of this author group have published using this measure in other investigations.
      • Awan SN
      • Gartner-Schmidt JL
      • Timmons LK
      • et al.
      Effects of a variably occluded face mask on the aerodynamic and acoustic characteristics of connected speech in patients with and without voice disorders.
      ,
      • Gillespie AI
      • Fanucchi A
      • Gartner-Schmidt J
      • et al.
      Phonation with a variably occluded facemask: effects of task duration.
      In fact, three paragraphs of the article's discussion are devoted to the importance of estimated subglottal pressure.
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