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Perception of Primary School Teachers Towards Voice Problems and Vocal Health-Seeking Behaviors: A qualitative study

  • Ritika Gautam
    Affiliations
    Department of Speech and Hearing, Manipal College of Health Professions, Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal, India
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  • Srikanth Nayak
    Affiliations
    Department of Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology, Yenepoya Medical College, Yenepoya University (Deemed to be University), Mangalore, 575018,Karnataka, India
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  • Usha Devadas
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence and reprint requests to Usha Devadas, Department of Speech and Hearing, Manipal College of Health Professions, Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal, 576 104, Karnataka, India.
    Affiliations
    Department of Speech and Hearing, Manipal College of Health Professions, Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal, India
    Search for articles by this author

      Summary

      Objective

      Teachers are the most common occupational group reporting to the voice clinics with dysphonia across the globe. However, less is known about teachers’ perceptions about their voice and voice problems. Hence the present study aimed to explore teachers’ perception about their teaching voice, voice problems and vocal health-seeking behaviors.

      Method

      A qualitative phenomenological research design using semi-structured interviews were conducted with fifteen female primary school teachers. Participants were asked to express their perception of teaching voice, vocal health care knowledge, and vocal hygiene practices. Using inductive analysis, the researchers converted the raw data into concepts or themes and discussed.

      Result

      The present study results showed that teachers perceive voice as the primary tool for their profession. However, teachers consider voice problems as part of their professional commitments. Despite knowing the harmful effects of voice problems, teachers’ pay less attention to their voice problems and perceive them as usual, unavoidable and part of their profession. Due to their demanding work schedule and not getting enough support from the management, they hesitate to consult medical professionals unless it severely affects them.

      Conclusions

      The data obtained from this study can be used to improve the teachers’ knowledge regarding vocal health and convince the school management to extend their support for the successful implementation of the vocal health training programs for teachers.

      Key Words

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