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Exploring the Clinical Characteristics of Superior Laryngeal Nerve Injury

  • Liying Liu
    Affiliations
    Department of Voice, Zhongshan Hospital of Xiamen University, School of Medicine, Xiamen University, Xiamen, China
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  • Yanli Ma
    Affiliations
    Department of Voice, Zhongshan Hospital of Xiamen University, School of Medicine, Xiamen University, Xiamen, China
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  • Eyad Saleh
    Affiliations
    Division of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin
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  • Ting Qiu
    Affiliations
    Department of Neurology, Zhongshan Hospital of Xiamen University, School of Medicine, Xiamen University, Xiamen, China
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  • Peiyun Zhuang
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence and reprint requests to Peiyun Zhuang, Department of Voice, Zhongshan Hospital of Xiamen University, School of Medicine, Xiamen University, Xiamen, China.
    Affiliations
    Department of Voice, Zhongshan Hospital of Xiamen University, School of Medicine, Xiamen University, Xiamen, China
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      Summary

      Objectives

      To observe the cases of superior laryngeal nerve injury along with summarizing and analyzing its clinical characteristics.

      Methods

      A total of 14 patients with unilateral superior laryngeal nerve injury (SLN) diagnosed by laryngeal electromyography (LEMG) in our department from 2018 to 2020 were collected as SLN injury group. A total of 14 healthy subjects with normal laryngeal electromyography were recruited as normal group matched by age and sex. The etiology and LEMG of the SLN injury group were analyzed, and the video stroboscopic manifestations of SLN injury group and normal group were compared to see the characteristic video stroboscopic manifestations of SLN injury.

      Results

      The most common causes of SLN injury were surgery and idiopathic etiology. Compared with normal group, the most frequent video stroboscopic manifestations of SLN injury group were vocal fold dyskinesia. Abnormal video stroboscopic manifestations occurred in normal group except larynx deviation, epiglottic petiole deviation, and dyskinesia. There was a significant difference between the two groups in various abnormal video stroboscopic manifestations (P < 0.05). Time limit widening was the most common manifestation of LEMG.

      Conclusions

      Vocal fold dyskinesia was a prominent finding in SLN injury, laryngeal deviation and epiglottic petiole deviation were relative specific signs of SLN injury. Vocal fold bowing combined with shortening will contribute to the diagnosis of SLN injury. There were no specific diagnostic signs for SLN injury, clinicians need further LEMG for a firm diagnosis.

      Key Words

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