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Comparative Study on the Effects of Surface Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation Between Subjects With Unilateral Vocal Fold Paralysis in the Paramedian and Median Positions

  • Pedro Amarante Andrade
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence and reprint requests to Pedro Amarante Andrade ,Musical Acoustics Research Centre, Music and Dance Faculty, Academy of Performing Arts in Prague, Praha, Praha, Czech Republic.
    Affiliations
    Musical Acoustics Research Centre, Music and Dance Faculty, Academy of Performing Arts in Prague, Praha, Praha, Czech Republic
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  • Marek Frič
    Affiliations
    Musical Acoustics Research Centre, Music and Dance Faculty, Academy of Performing Arts in Prague, Praha, Praha, Czech Republic
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  • Jakub Dršata
    Affiliations
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Charles University, Faculty of Medicine in Hradec Kralove, Hradec Králové, Czech Republic
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  • Jana Krtičková
    Affiliations
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Charles University, Faculty of Medicine in Hradec Kralove, Hradec Králové, Czech Republic
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  • Viktor Chrobok
    Affiliations
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Charles University, Faculty of Medicine in Hradec Kralove, Hradec Králové, Czech Republic
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Published:October 28, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvoice.2022.09.014

      Summary

      Objectives: To describe the impact of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) on two different types of unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP): in the paramedian and median positions.
      Methods: Subjects underwent 12-minute-long sessions of NMES for 5 consecutive days (1 hour of intervention in total). A modified electrode placement was used to target the adductor muscles of the larynx. Acoustic, electroglottographic, imaging, auditory-perceptual, and self-perceived data were collected.
      Results: Apart from SPL, the results showed significant improvement in all vocal parameters for the subject with the paralyzed vocal fold in the paramedian position, but not for the subject with the paralyzed vocal fold in the median position. Both subjects demonstrated the activation of the cricothyroid muscles with the NMES application. They also reported no negative symptoms in the larynx or the presence of delayed onset muscle soreness postintervention.
      Conclusions: The results of this study support the use of NMES as an effective method for the treatment of UVFP in the paramedian position.

      Key Words

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