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Management of Pediatric Voice Disorders: Perceived Knowledge, Confidence, Attitude and Practice Patterns Among School-based Speech-language Pathologists in Hong Kong

  • Estella P.-M. Ma
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence and reprint requests to Dr. Estella Ma, PhD, Voice Research Laboratory, Academic Unit of Human Communication, Development & Information Sciences, Faculty of Education, The University of Hong Kong, 7/F Meng Wah Complex, Pokfulam, Hong Kong.
    Affiliations
    Voice Research Laboratory, Academic Unit of Human Communication, Development & Information Sciences, Faculty of Education, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong
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  • Amy Y.-T. Chow
    Affiliations
    Voice Research Laboratory, Academic Unit of Human Communication, Development & Information Sciences, Faculty of Education, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong
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  • Verna W.-Y. Lam
    Affiliations
    Voice Research Laboratory, Academic Unit of Human Communication, Development & Information Sciences, Faculty of Education, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong
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Published:November 15, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvoice.2022.10.010

      Summary

      Objective

      This survey evaluated the levels of self-perceived knowledge, confidence, attitude and practice patterns of school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs) in Hong Kong regarding their management of pediatric voice disorders.

      Methods

      SLPs with experience working in school settings in Hong Kong were invited to complete an anonymous online survey. The survey ascertained SLPs’ perception of their knowledge, confidence, attitude and practice patterns regarding their management of pediatric voice disorders. It also explored the barriers and facilitators to effective service provision for children with voice problems in schools.

      Results

      A total of 85 responses were received, of which 56 respondents with complete responses were selected for analysis. Results showed that respondents in general did not consider themselves having sufficient knowledge on pediatric voice. They did not feel fully confident in managing pediatric voice cases. Even though they exhibited a positive attitude and agreed that pediatric voice management was important, discrepancies were noted between their attitude and practice. Barriers that hinder practice include the lack of professional guidelines, insufficient time and resource as well as difficulties to conduct comprehensive voice assessments with children.

      Conclusion

      The study findings urge the needs of enhancing school-based SLPs’ perceived knowledge and competence in managing pediatric voice disorders. The study also identifies strategic directions to improve service provision for children with voice disorders in schools.

      Key Words

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