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Associations of Personality, Physical and Mental Health with Voice Range Profiles

  • Thomas A. Ostermann
    Affiliations
    Phoniatrics and Audiology, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany

    LIFE Leipzig Research Centre for Civilization Diseases, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany

    Institute for Medical Informatics, Statistics and Epidemiology, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany
    Search for articles by this author
  • Michael Fuchs
    Affiliations
    Phoniatrics and Audiology, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany

    LIFE Leipzig Research Centre for Civilization Diseases, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany
    Search for articles by this author
  • Andreas Hinz
    Affiliations
    LIFE Leipzig Research Centre for Civilization Diseases, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany

    Department of Medical Psychology and Medical Sociology, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 These authors contributed equally as senior authors.
    Christoph Engel
    Footnotes
    1 These authors contributed equally as senior authors.
    Affiliations
    LIFE Leipzig Research Centre for Civilization Diseases, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany

    Institute for Medical Informatics, Statistics and Epidemiology, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    1 These authors contributed equally as senior authors.
    Thomas Berger
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence and reprint requests to Thomas Berger, Phoniatrics and Audiology, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital Leipzig, Liebigstrasse 10-14, Haus 1, 04103 Leipzig, Germany.
    Footnotes
    1 These authors contributed equally as senior authors.
    Affiliations
    Phoniatrics and Audiology, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany

    LIFE Leipzig Research Centre for Civilization Diseases, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    1 These authors contributed equally as senior authors.
Published:January 02, 2023DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvoice.2022.11.025

      Summary

      Objectives

      There is evidence in the literature that voice characteristics are linked to mental and physical health. The aim of this explorative study was to determine associations between voice parameters measured by a voice range profile (VRP) and personality, mental and physical health.

      Study design

      Cross-sectional population-based study.

      Methods

      As part of the LIFE-Adult-Study, 2639 individuals aged 18-80 years, randomly sampled from the general population, completed both speaking and singing voice tasks and answered questionnaires on depression, anxiety, life satisfaction, personality and quality of life. The voice parameters used were fundamental frequency, sound pressure level, their ranges and maximum phonation time. The associations were examined with the help of correlation and regression analyses.

      Results

      Wider ranges between the lowest and highest frequency, between the lowest and highest sound pressure level and longer maximum phonation time were significantly correlated with extraversion and quality of life in both sexes, as well as openness and agreeableness in women. Smaller ranges and shorter maximum phonation time were significantly correlated with depression. Neuroticism in men was inversely correlated with the maximum phonation time. In the speaking VRP, the associations for sound pressure level were more pronounced than for the fundamental frequency. The same was true in reverse for the singing VRP. Few associations were found for anxiety, life satisfaction and conscientiousness.

      Conclusions

      Weak associations between voice parameters derived from the VRP and mental and physical health, as well as personality were seen in this exploratory study. The results indicate that the VRP measurements in a clinical context are not significantly affected by these parameters and thus are a robust measurement method for voice parameters.

      Key Words

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